NEC Classic Motor Show Sale 2017

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1969 Aston Martin DBS6 Manual

Lot No.: 606

Registration: WYF 573G
Chassis Number: DBS5334R
Engine Number: 4004090S
Number of cylinders: 6
CC: 3995
Year of Manufacture: 1969
RHD/LHD: Right Hand Drive
Buy now for (£): 95,450Contact us

There are those cars that try ever so slightly too hard to achieve a sense of presence and there are some cars that have a natural sense of absence, ones where you forget their launch, demise, and general existence. Then there is the Aston Martin DBS, a prime example of a car that effortlessly dominates. Some knowledgeable Aston enthusiasts rattle on about the William Towns design in its later ‘Oscar India’ incarnation but over time I suspect that the original double-headlight DBS of 1967 – 1972 may well win the style-stakes, and not just because of its starring roles in On Her Majesty’s Secret Service or The Persuaders! There is something elegantly formidable about this particular Aston Martin and its coachwork is so timeless in appearance, that it is near impossible to believe that the DBS is 50 years old this year. 

When the car made its debut at the 1967 Paris Motor Show, its profile seemed to be in the tradition of previous DB cars but its sheer size – it is six inches wider than the DB6 -  gave visitors an impression of effortless power. Some traditionalists regarded the four headlamps as further evidence of Britain going to the dogs, along with the introduction of Radio One and the  Sgt. Pepper LP, and muttered that everyone involved in the project merited a damned good thrashing. However, other motorists saw the latest Aston Martin as the ideal blend of tradition and modernity; here was a motor car that would plough through lesser traffic, leaving pretenders to its grand touring crown in its wake.

Fitting neatly into that mould is this 1969 DBS6 finished in Champagne Gold with a boardroom Black interior and chrome wire wheels. Initially registered on 11th April 1969, the car left the factory finished in White bur during its restoration in 2005 it was painted the colour you see it today. Aston Martin DBs are the exception to the rule that a colour change devalues the car and the reason that so many have one, two or even three changes is because it's comparatively easy. The engine bay, floor pan, and boot are finished in black at the factory so it's possible to completely paint the car to a totally professional standard without taking out the engine, brakes, wiring, dashboard, headlining etc.

This is a usable, three owner car, which is working well and drives well, although it could benefit from further cosmetic improvement which will take the car to its true potential.

This particular car has twin headlights and a manual gearbox, both very desirable, and has covered just over 71,000 miles. The engine bay is in good condition and on inspection of the chassis, the previous restorer has done an excellent job. A full service and overhaul of the front suspension have recently been carried out.  Like most Astons there is a history file so large you could fly a hang-glider off it and it contains squillions of invoices, photographic evidence of a complete engine rebuild. restoration details, MOTs etc illustrating the many thousands of pounds spent over the years.  The car was driven back from the continent not long ago and ran very well with no issues, holding excellent oil pressure. 

We have five DBS examples for sale today and within that context, we feel this car is sensibly guided to allow for some cosmetic improvements in a dynamic market.